AA Addiction Recovery

Recovery and faith: 12 Steps as a Spiritual Path

The reasons the twelve steps work, is because it is a spiritual work. A.A., like many spiritual paths in this insane Generation, has drifted steadily from her roots. Recovery is a spiritual work and it is good to learn the history of the program so we can get a glimpse of what the founder’s meant when they said we must turn our lives and will over to God as we understood HIM (Yes, they identified God as a Him). The following article shows A.A.’s evolution from a Christian Society known as the Oxford Group.

 

The Twelve Steps and Their Relationship to Christianity

Taken from the National Association of Christian Recovery (Link Below)

It is well known that the twelve-step program developed by Alcoholics Anonymous has become the model for many other popular, lay-managed programs of treatment targeted at people with addictions, compulsions, or dependencies. These conditions include nicotine abuse, narcotics and cocaine abuse, compulsive eating and gambling. Alcoholics Anonymous estimate there are now more than 87,000 A.A. groups in 136 countries world-wide, representing 1.8 million members! Including memberships in other twelve-step programs, it can be estimated safely that millions of individuals around the world attend twelve-step meetings every week.

Alcoholics Anonymous began on June 10, 1935, co-founded by William Griffith Wilson (Bill W.) and Dr. Robert Holbrook Smith (Dr. Bob). Wilson conceived the idea of Alcoholics Anonymous while he was hospitalized for excessive drinking in December 1934. During his hospital stay, Wilson had a spiritual experience that removed his desire to drink. In the following months, he tried to persuade other alcoholics to stop drinking just as he had. Wilson found his first “convert” in Smith, who was willing to follow Wilson’s method to find freedom from alcoholism. Four years later, Wilson and Smith published the book, Alcoholics Anonymous, which contains the Twelve Steps and a spiritually based program of recovery from alcoholism.

 

READ MORE

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s